Scandinavia--Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Iceland, and Finland--is blessed with five distinct, yet related, cultures.

Learn about the stories behind the legends, about the countries, and most of all about the people.

SITEMAP





"We sailed our ships to any shore that offered the best hope of booty; we feared no fellow on earth..."
Saga of Arrow-Odd

What is Scandinavia's largest city?
Helsinki
Stockholm
Copenhagen
Oslo
Stavanger

Correct answer?
COPENHAGEN
Denmark

København, known to the rest of the world as Copenhagen, wonderful Copenhagen, became the capital of Denmark in 1415, but several of its fine old buildings date from the reign of King Christian IV, from the late 16th to the mid-17th century.

Read more

Feature: Elsinore Castle
Food: Lefse, Almond Bread
         Iceland's Hearty Fare
History: The Round Tower
Arts:   Scandinavian Pewter
          Georg Jensen
People: Hans Christian
Andersen
     
News: Happiest Countries
          Bella Sky Hotel

Swedish Burials Equal for All
by Bob Brooke



Every year about 95,000 people die in Sweden and, according to the law, everyone must be buried. There must be room for everyone in the cemeteries, therefore the future needs of space have to be predicted. Because of this funerals must be part of the planning process.

In Sweden there are three major religions besides the Swedish Protestant Church–Judaism, Islam and the Catholicism. Each has its own funereal customs and traditions.

Swedish funeral services have a unique way to deal with the different wishes concerning the funeral customs and places of burial of people of different religions. Swedish law prescribes that the parish church and the select vestry have the responsibility to provide special burial grounds for those who don’t belong to the Swedish Church. In Stockholm both Catholics and Jews have their own cemeteries. Muslims, however, are buried in special areas within the cemeteries of the Swedish Church. Because Sweden is a secularized country where religion is a private matter, non-protestant groups benefit. The Swedish Church has agreed to give everyone the type of funeral and special burial ground they require. This is especially carried out in Stockholm according to the law where every religious group that has asked for a special burial compound within a Swedish Church cemetery has received it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

< Back to Sweden Basics                               

Every year about 95 000 people die in Sweden and, according to the law, everyone must be buried. There must be room for everyone in the cemeteries, therefore the future needs of space have to be predicted. Because of this funerals must be part of the planning process.

Read more about Swedish burials

News from Norway
from Aftenposten
News from Denmark
from Denmark.dk
News from Sweden
from the SR International 
News from Finland
from Finnish News Agency STT
News from Iceland
from The Iceland Review
All news is in English
.

THE VIKINGS:
THE NORTH ATLANTIC SAGA

In the early Middle Ages, driven by famine at home and the promise of wealth to be had in other lands, the Vikings set out from Scandinavia to conquer parts of England, Ireland, France, Russia, and even Turkey. Bolstered by their successes, the Vikings pushed westward, eventually crossing the North Atlantic and founding settlements in Iceland, Greenland, and Newfoundland in Canada.
Read more         Go to the Book Shop >

To read more articles by Bob Brooke, visit his Web site.

 
 

HOME | ABOUT | ARTICLES | AUTHOR'S BIO | RESOURCES | CONTACT
Site contents Copyrighted, 2002-2011, by Bob Brooke Communications.
Site design and development by
BBC Web Services.